I moved recently from northern Illinois to SW Ohio

and was shopping in the grocery section of the local Wal-Mart a couple of days after I’d moved in, when a woman came up to me and asked me whether I was a Reds fan (I was wearing a Cubs cap – yes, I’m the longsuffering sort, I suppose – and the designs of the C’s for the Cubs and Reds are clearly different, but she was looking for any opening to strike up a conversation, as you’ll soon note). I said no, and that I had recently moved from Illinois. We introduced ourselves to each other (her name is Sondra), and then she asked me whether I’d be interested in making some extra money either full or part-time.

When I heard that, an alarm bell went off in my head (thanks in part to the horror stories I’ve read here), but I thought there was no harm in hearing her sales pitch later on, so we exchanged phone numbers and went our separate ways.

The following evening, she called me to sell me on Primerica. I didn’t want to commit to anything – even though she would have preferred that I do so – so I told her I would think about her offer to come to an initial meeting at the local PFS office the following Tuesday, then hung up.

I then went into ‘snoop mode’ via Google, and had my worst suspicions confirmed. PFS is an MLM that has, like other MLM’s, left a trail of tears in its wake. PFS tells you that via their simple interest plan, you’ll pay off your mortgage and other debts earlier, and pay less along the way. What they don’t tell you is that you will actually end up paying just as much, if not more, through their plan, and that if your financial situation ever changes and you want to restructure your plan (or if you ever miss a payment to PFS), you’re screwed, as your payments then go way up. In short, PFS gets their hooks into a lot of low-income people who have made poor financial decisions and are looking for a way out.

After finding all of this out, I called Sondra back and got voice mail – my message was ‘Thanks, but no thanks.’ She was good enough not to call back to try to pressure me any further.

I’ve been very busy the past few months, so maybe I’ve missed the PFS horror stories on this forum. Maybe some of you have Primerica stories to share. In any event, I’m glad that this forum exists, as it’s helped me to hone my BS radar.

We’ll get this straight eventually!

The book of Diamonds & up is called the “Profiles Of Success.” There are several editions of this book.

The book, “Merchants Of Deception” is an eBook by Eric Scheibeler. Other than looking in on this group from time to time, he has little connection here. He, Bo Short and my wife and I appeared on Dateline NBC to talk about the business and the tools scam.

This group was founded by Ruth Carter, who also (btw) wrote a book. Her book is called “Amway Motivational Organizations: Behind The Smoke And Mirrors.”